MSR Windboiler – Wind Testing

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MSR Windboiler – Wind Testing

Postby Hikin_Jim » Tue Nov 25, 2014 11:09 pm

With their new Windboiler, MSR has definitely done a great job on the "human factors" (better handle, better lid, a cup that's actually useful, more slots so the pot attaches more easily, etc.), but if the Windboiler isn't significantly better than a Jetboil at handling wind, then it's really just a prettied up Jetboil.

So, how well does a Windboiler handle wind? I decided to find out.

I did several head to head tests with a Jetboil Sol in light to moderate winds. I could see that the Windboiler remained fairly constant while the Jetboil would lose ground (boil time would lengthen) as the winds increased, but I didn't really have the sense that I fully understood the capabilities of the Windboiler. Time to put it to a real test I thought.

So I headed to the windiest spot I could think of in Southern California – the San Gorgonio Pass area near Banning, CA, home to many a wind turbine.

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I picked a spot for testing at the mouth of a canyon where I thought winds would come whistling through. I was not disappointed.
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I have put up two videos on my blog that I think show the difference in the way a Jetboil behaves vs. a Windboiler in significant winds. Have a look if you like.

MSR Windboiler – Wind Testing

HJ
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Re: MSR Windboiler – Wind Testing

Postby HH8 » Wed Nov 26, 2014 10:04 pm

I thought it was only my PERCEPTION that it was taking longer to boil because I was so miserable in the high winds.
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Re: MSR Windboiler – Wind Testing

Postby Hikin_Jim » Wed Nov 26, 2014 10:20 pm

HH8 wrote:I thought it was only my PERCEPTION that it was taking longer to boil because I was so miserable in the high winds.
Oh, no. Most any stove will take longer in the wind. Some are quite a bit worse than others. The problem with upright canister stoves, including the Jetboil is that they're particularly susceptible to wind. It's quite a triumph of design and engineering to create a windproof upright canister stove, but MSR has done it.

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Re: MSR Windboiler – Wind Testing

Postby arocknoid » Thu Nov 27, 2014 1:39 am

Good writeup as usual, Jim. Thanks for the (*ahem*) hot tip on the boiling-in-the-wind strategies / design comparisons.

And for those who wonder why a watched pot never boils (or, at least, why it seems to take soooo long, Poor Richard), here's an article explaining time perception retrospectively vs. prospectively.

Ties in with hiking in other ways:
-- why time flies when you're having fun
-- why the trip back from someplace always feels shorter than the trip that got you there.
-- why time slows when we're in pain


http://www.minnpost.com/second-opinion/ ... ever-boils

The journal article--free--(use a burner login e.g. bugmenot if you prefer)
http://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volum ... daily-life


Now if you really want to mess with your time perception vis-a-vis kitchen/victuals preparation, "brew up" some coffee via an Oji dripper. Mata ashita!

cheers,
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Re: MSR Windboiler – Wind Testing

Postby Hikin_Jim » Thu Nov 27, 2014 12:57 pm

arocknoid wrote:Good writeup as usual, Jim. Thanks for the (*ahem*) hot tip on the boiling-in-the-wind strategies / design comparisons.
Oh, yes, I'm quite nearly bubbling over with excitement. ;)

arocknoid wrote:Ties in with hiking in other ways:
-- why time flies when you're having fun
-- why the trip back from someplace always feels shorter than the trip that got you there.
-- why time slows when we're in pain
Well, hikes often feel far longer at least to me on the way back. Often I'm fresh in the morning and near spend in the afternoon/evening when I'm heading back. Particularly when the last part off a hike is in the dark, the it seems to take forever to get back to the car.

But boy do I know what you mean about time slowing when in pain. Zoiks.

HJ
Backpacking stove reviews and information:  Adventures In Stoving
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