nutritional supplements

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nutritional supplements

Postby HH8 » Sat Oct 22, 2011 7:44 am

When different people are attempting the same rigorous exercise (i.e. C2C), would the nutritional supplements differ according to:
gender
BMI
age group
?
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Postby zippetydude » Sat Oct 22, 2011 9:23 pm

Yes! At my advanced age I need much more vitamin i than I did when I was younger.

But seriously, that's a great question! I know I don't need as many calories as I used to - in my twenties, I needed 4000 - 5000 calories a day to maintain my body weight. Nowadays, if I eat 400 - 500, I gain a bazillion pounds. If I eat whatever I want, I will replace Pluto as the 9th planet. Something is changing here...

z
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Postby HikeUp » Sat Oct 22, 2011 10:06 pm

zippetydude wrote:if I eat 400 - 500, I gain a bazillion pounds.


Can a human survive on just 4 to 5 hundred calories a day?
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Postby zippetydude » Mon Oct 24, 2011 3:32 pm

HikeUp wrote:
zippetydude wrote:if I eat 400 - 500, I gain a bazillion pounds.


Can a human survive on just 4 to 5 hundred calories a day?


Not for long. I was just missing the old days when my metabolism still worked. Hey, did you see the question I posted for birders?

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Postby Hikin_Jim » Mon Oct 24, 2011 3:48 pm

zippetydude wrote: If I eat whatever I want, I will replace Pluto as the 9th planet. Something is changing here...

z
Well, you're right in a way -- Pluto is no longer considered a planet. If you become heavier than the 8th and now final planet (Neptune), then you really have been over eating. :shock:

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Re: nutritional supplements

Postby Ellen » Thu Nov 03, 2011 5:39 pm

Howdy HHB :)

Our primary needs during long hikes are carbohydrate, water, and salt.

Research by Jeukendrup and colleagues at the University of Birmingham in the UK has shown that recommendations for carbohydrate intake during exercise can be absolute (grams per hour) and not based on body weight.

The 2010 International Olympic Committee nutrition guidelines recommend that athletes consume up to 60 to 90 g of carbohydrate per hour during endurance and ultra-endurance exercise lasting 2.5 to 3 hours and beyond.

Miles of smiles,
Ellen

Ellen Coleman, MA, MPH, RD, CSSD
Sports dietitian and cactus ass

HH8 wrote:When different people are attempting the same rigorous exercise (i.e. C2C), would the nutritional supplements differ according to:
gender
BMI
age group
?
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Fueling during hiking

Postby Ellen » Thu Nov 03, 2011 5:40 pm

Other considerations...

During hiking, ultra-running, and cycling, it helps to carry a variety of foods to prevent “flavor fatigue” and an associated decrease in energy intake. Alternating between sweet choices (eg, gels, sports drinks, candy) and savory/salty choices (eg, pretzels, baked chips) helps to maintain the desire to eat. Consuming solid food with small amounts of protein and fat (eg, a turkey, cheese, or peanut butter sandwich) also helps provide satiety and variety.

Athletes use a variety of fluids, foods and gels during training and competition. Liquid and solid carbohydrates are equally effective in increasing blood glucose and improving performance, though each has certain advantages.

Sports drinks and other fluids containing carbohydrate encourage the consumption of water needed to maintain normal hydration during exercise. The sodium in sports drinks helps to replace sweat sodium losses and stimulate thirst. Sports drinks are a practical way to obtain water, carbohydrate, and sodium.

However, carbohydrate-rich foods, energy bars, and gels can be easily carried during exercise and provide both variety and satiety. These items are compact, can be easily carried, provide variety (different flavors and textures) to prevent a boredom-related decline in energy intake, and help relieve hunger. High fiber foods should be limited during competition to avoid gastrointestinal distress.

Athletes should drink plenty of water when they eat solid food, especially a sports bar. Otherwise the product will settle poorly and the athlete may feel there’s “a rock in the gut.” In addition to aiding digestion, drinking water while eating solid foods encourages the athlete to hydrate adequately.

When the athlete’s gut blood flow is low (e.g. during intense cycling or running) the athlete should emphasize carbohydrate-rich fluids (sports drinks, liquid meals, high carbohydrate liquid supplements, fruit juices and carbohydrate gels) to promote rapid gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. When the athlete’s gut blood flow is moderate (e.g. during moderate-paced cycling or slow running) the athlete may be able to consume easily digested carbohydrate-rich foods such as sports bars, fruit, and grain products (fig bars, bagels, graham crackers) in addition to liquid foods and fluids.

Athletes can generally consume more calories per hour cycling than running. Ironman triathlon competitors also often decrease their calorie intake towards the end of the bike segment to start the run with a fairly empty gut to lower the risk of developing gastrointestinal distress. During the run segment of a triathlon, athletes usually consume only sports drinks, gels, and water to reduce the risk of gut distress.

Consuming small amounts at frequent intervals (every 30 to 60 minutes) helps to promote hydration, maintain blood glucose levels, and prevent gastrointestinal upset. eat or drink before feeling hungry or tired, usually within 30 to 60 minutes after starting to exercise. The athlete’s foods and fluids should be familiar (tested in training), easily digested, and enjoyable (to encourage eating and drinking).

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Re: nutritional supplements

Postby Hikin_Jim » Thu Nov 03, 2011 6:08 pm

Ellen wrote:...and cactus ass
Dare I guess how much carb uptake you get that way? :shock: :lol:

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thank you

Postby HH8 » Thu Nov 03, 2011 8:05 pm

I knew I came to the right place with my question!
Thanks again Ellen
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Postby Ellen » Fri Nov 04, 2011 9:36 am

And of course, I left out the most important sentence :roll:

Athletes should individually determine a refueling plan that meets their nutritional goals (including hydration) and minimizes gastrointestinal distress.

The goal is to find products that work for you. Some folks use sports drinks such as Gatorade, others don't like them or can't tolerate them. With my sensitive gut (scaring from Crohn's disease), I can't handle sports bars when I'm pushing hard (e.g. climbing out of Flatrock) but gels and Gatorade are perfect. Many of my friends do great with sports bars.

In my last two Skylines, my shirt was covered with salt from sweating. The average amount of sodium lost in two pounds of sweat is 800 mg -- that's almost a half of a teaspoon of table salt. Some folks lose more, some less. Being fit and heat acclimated decreases your sodium losses. However, some folks (salty sweaters) lose a lot of sodium regardless.

Muscle cramps are due to salt losses (specifically sodium), not potassium. On a warm/hot Skyline, it's easy to see how someone can start cramping climbing out of Flatrock. Last Saturday, I was passing out fast food salt packets to folks who were cramping. There are also salt replacement products (e.g. Salt Stick) for people who prefer drinking only water.

Coconut water is popular among hikers but low in sodium. If you like it, keep using it but carry a source of salt.

When I work with endurance athletes to help develop a fuel/hydration plan, we test out a variety of products (sports drinks, gels, bars, jelly beans, blocs) and real food (dried fruit, nuts, sandwiches, chips, etc.) to find the combination that works the best.

Miles of smiles,
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